top of page
  • Nick Burgess

What Is A Phantom Stock Plan?

The following article is for entertainment and educational purposes only, and should not be considered financial advice. Please seek a licensed financial professional for any individual financial advice. Links below may be affiliate links in which the site makes a small commission at no cost to you.

 

A phantom equity plan (a.k.a "phantom stock program" or "shadow stock plan") is a form of incentive compensation that is offered to key employees in the form of "phantom" shares of stock. These shares are not actual stock units, but rather represent the right to receive a cash payment or stock at a later date, based on the performance of the company or a specific measure of the employee's performance.

two men looking at a piece of paper with laptops discussing a phantom stock plan

Phantom equity plans are used as a way to align the interests of employees with those of the company's shareholders. By giving employees a financial stake in the company's performance, the hope is that they will work harder and be more motivated to help the company succeed. Phantom equity plans can also be used as a way to attract talented employees, as well as employee retention, as they provide a sense of ownership and investment in the company.

How Phantom Stock Works

There are several types of phantom equity plans, each with their own unique features and benefits. One common type is the "phantom stock" plan, which gives employees the right to receive cash or stock at a later date, based on the company's current share price at that time. Another type is the "stock appreciation rights" plan, which gives employees the right to receive cash or stock based on the appreciation of the company's real stock over a specific period of time.

Phantom equity plans can also be designed to be performance-based, with the value of the phantom shares tied to specific measures of the employee's performance or company performance. This can include measures such as revenue growth, goals based around the value of the company, profitability, or the attainment of specific goals or milestones.

One of the main benefits of phantom equity plans for the company is that they can be a cost-effective way to provide incentives to employees, as they do not require the company to issue actual company shares. Additionally, phantom equity plans do not dilute the ownership of existing shareholders, as the phantom shares are not actual shares of stock.

Another benefit is that phantom equity plans can be customized to meet the specific needs of the company and its employees when tied into long-term incentive plans. For example, a company may choose to tie the value of the phantom shares to the performance of a specific division or business unit, rather than the overall performance of the company.

Things to Consider When Using Phantom Stock Units

One important aspect to consider when implementing phantom stock awards is the tax implications for a plan participant. In most cases, the employee will be required to pay income tax on the value of the phantom shares at the time they are received, regardless of whether they are received in the form of cash or actual shares of stock. This can significantly reduce the value of the phantom shares and may make the plan less attractive to employees as they likely will not receive the full value of the plan. However, there are ways to structure the plan in a tax-efficient manner, such as by providing for a tax-deferred vesting period of the phantom shares or by using a "qualified" plan that is eligible for special tax treatment. However, this could introduce capital gains taxes to the equation for your employees that participate.

Another important aspect to consider when implementing a phantom equity plan is the potential impact on the company's financial statements. Phantom equity plans can have a significant impact on a company's financial statements, as they are considered a form of long-term liability. This means that the company will be required to record the value of the phantom shares as a liability on its balance sheet and to make periodic accruals for the expected payments to be made to employees. This can have a significant impact on a company's financial statements, particularly if the plan is large or if the company has a significant number of employees participating in the plan.

Another important aspect to consider is the communication and communication strategy of the plan to the employees. A clear and concise communication and education strategy can help employees to understand the terms of the plan and its value. This can help to ensure that employees are motivated to participate in the plan and to work towards achieving the goals and milestones that will trigger the payment of the phantom shares.

Additionally, it's important to have a well-designed vesting schedule to the plan, meaning that the phantom shares will vest over a set time period, typically based on the employee's continued service with the company. This can help to ensure that employees are motivated to remain with the company and to continue to contribute to its success, as they're more likely to see these types of compensation plans as a real factor in their employee benefits.

Something else to consider is the role of the Board of Directors in the plan. The Board of Directors should be involved in the development and implementation of the plan, and should be responsible for monitoring the plan's performance and making any necessary adjustments. The Board of Directors should also be responsible for ensuring that the plan is in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations.

In addition to the above considerations, it is also important to ensure that the plan is fair and equitable to all employees. This can be achieved by providing the same opportunities for participation in the plan to all employees and by setting the same performance targets and milestones for all employees. The company should also consider the impact of the plan on employees at different levels of the organization, such as managers and executives, to ensure that it is fair and equitable for all.


Drawbacks of a Phantom Equity Plan

However, there are also some potential drawbacks to using phantom equity plans. One potential drawback is that they can be complex and difficult to understand, which can make it difficult for employees to fully appreciate the value of the incentives being offered. Additionally, phantom equity plans may not be suitable for all types of companies or employees, as they typically require a significant level of financial sophistication and a long-term investment horizon.

Another drawback is that phantom equity plans can be costly to administer and may require significant time and resources to set up and manage. Additionally, the value of the phantom shares may be affected by factors outside of the control of the company or the employee, such as market conditions or changes in the company's financial performance.

Moreover, it's essential to keep in mind that a phantom equity plan is not a replacement for a well-designed compensation package that includes a competitive salary and benefits. A phantom equity plan should be used in addition to other forms of compensation, not as a substitute.

As an employee that receives a phantom stock plan, you need to be aware that these are not a replacement for an actual stock option plan that awards you real common stock. Actual common stock comes with basic benefits of stock ownership, such as: actual equity in the company's performance, profits interest and dividends, voting rights when it comes to board-driven decisions, and the ability to sell your number of shares at the company's stock price when you need to sell, rather than when you're finally awarded your shares. You're also likely to get taxed more under this type of plan due to these awards dinging your ordinary income tax rates, rather than traditional capital gains taxes that you'd typically be subject to if you were just selling common stock.

Lastly, it's important to remember that phantom equity plans are not suitable for all types of companies or employees. Such plans are typically used by larger, public companies that have the resources to set up and administer the plan. They are not suitable for small or privately held companies, as they may not have the resources to set up and administer the plan. Additionally, phantom equity plans may not be suitable for employees who are not interested in taking a long-term investment in the company or who do not have the financial sophistication to understand the plan.

Conclusion

In conclusion, phantom equity plans can be a valuable tool for companies looking to align the interests of employees with those of shareholders, and to attract and retain talented employees. They can also be cost-effective and customized to meet the specific needs of the company. However, they can be complex and difficult to understand, costly to administer and may not be suitable for all types of companies or employees. Companies considering using a phantom equity plan should carefully weigh the potential benefits and drawbacks, and consult with legal and financial experts to ensure that the plan is structured in a way that is compliant with all applicable laws and regulations.

Comments


bottom of page