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  • Nick Burgess

Technical Analysis: Astrology for Investors?

The following is for entertainment and educational purposes only, and is not financial advice. Please do your own research and contact a professional prior to investing.

 

The Basics of Investing with Technical Analysis

Technical analysis is a method of evaluating securities by analyzing statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices and volume. Unlike fundamental analysis, which seeks to measure a security's intrinsic value, technical analysis uses charts and other tools to identify patterns and trends that can suggest buy or sell opportunities.

a trading candlestick chart with RSI and MACD indicators

The origins of technical analysis can be traced back to the early 20th century, when Charles Dow, co-founder of Dow Jones & Company, developed a system for analyzing stock market trends. Since then, technical analysis has evolved and become a widely used investment tool...but why?


Basic Concepts of Technical Analysis

There are several key concepts in technical analysis that every investor should understand.

Trend: The overall direction in which a security's price is moving is referred to as its trend. Trends can be upward (bullish), downward (bearish), or sideways (neutral) (see also: fucked). Identifying the trend can be helpful in determining whether to buy or sell a particular security.


Support and resistance: Support and resistance are levels at which a security's price tends to stop falling (support) or rising (resistance). These levels can be identified by looking at past price action and are often marked on charts with horizontal lines.


Indicators: Technical indicators are statistical measurements based on price and/or volume that can be used to identify trends or potential turning points in a security's price. Some common technical indicators include moving averages, relative strength index (RSI), and the moving average convergence divergence (MACD) indicator.


What is RSI in Technical Analysis?

The relative strength index (RSI) is a technical indicator that is commonly used to measure the strength of a security's price action. It is calculated using the average of the security's gains and losses over a specified time period, and is plotted on a scale of 0 to 100.


The RSI is typically plotted on a separate window below the security's price chart and is used to identify potential overbought or oversold conditions. When the RSI is above 70, it is generally considered to be overbought, which may indicate that the security's price is due for a pullback. Conversely, when the RSI is below 30, it is considered to be oversold, which may suggest that the security is undervalued and could be due for a price bounce.

Traders and investors often use the RSI as a confirming indicator, meaning they will look for the RSI to support the direction of the price trend before taking a position. For example, if the RSI is above 70 and the security's price is in an uptrend, this may be seen as a bullish sign and could indicate that the uptrend is likely to continue. However, if the RSI is below 30 and the security's price is in a downtrend, this may be seen as a bearish sign and could suggest that the downtrend is likely to continue.


It is important to note that the RSI is a momentum indicator, and as such, it can be prone to generating false signals. It is best used in conjunction with other technical indicators and with a solid understanding of the underlying security's fundamentals.


The RSI is a technical indicator that is used to identify potential overbought or oversold conditions in a security's price. It is calculated using the average of the security's gains and losses over a specified time period, and is plotted on a scale of 0 to 100. The RSI is often used as a confirming indicator, but it can be prone to generating false signals and should be used with caution.


Types of Charts and Chart Patterns

There are several different types of charts that can be used in technical analysis, each with its own unique features and advantages. These charts are created by plotting historical price data over a specific time frame.


Line charts: A line chart is a simple type of chart that plots the closing price of a security over time. It consists of a series of connected data points, forming a line that shows the overall price trend of the security. Line charts are often used to identify long-term trends and to smooth out short-term price fluctuations.


Bar charts: A bar chart is a more detailed type of chart that plots the opening, closing, high, and low prices of a security over a given time period. Each vertical bar represents the range of price movement for a specific time period, with the left end of the bar representing the opening price and the right end representing the closing price. The high and low prices are represented by horizontal lines extending from the top and bottom of the bar, respectively. Bar charts can provide more information than line charts, but they can also be cluttered and harder to interpret.

Candlestick charts: Candlestick charts are a type of chart that visually represents the price action of a security over a given time period. Each candlestick represents a specific time period, and the body of the candlestick is shaded to show whether the security's price closed higher or lower than its opening price. If the price closed higher, the body of the candlestick is white (or unshaded), and if it closed lower, the body is black (or shaded). The wicks of the candlestick represent the highest and lowest prices reached during the time period. Candlestick charts are popular because they can provide a lot of information in a compact and visually appealing format.


Chart patterns: Technical analysts often look for specific patterns in charts to help identify potential buying or selling opportunities. These patterns are formed by the price action of a security and can be used to predict future price movements. Some common chart patterns include head and shoulders, cup and handle, triangle, and wedge. Chart patterns can be found on any time frame, but they are most commonly identified on daily or weekly charts.


Using Technical Analysis in Investment Decisions

Technical analysis can be a useful tool for investors, but it is important to understand how to incorporate it into your investment strategy. Here are a few tips for using technical analysis in your investment decisions:

  • Use technical analysis in conjunction with other investment approaches, such as fundamental analysis: Technical analysis can be a useful supplement to fundamental analysis, which looks at a security's intrinsic value. Combining the two approaches can provide a more comprehensive view of a security's value and potential.

  • Practice risk management: As with any investment strategy, it is important to manage risk when using technical analysis. This can involve setting stop-loss orders, diversifying your portfolio, and being mindful of your overall risk tolerance.

  • Keep up to date with market conditions: Technical analysis is based on past price and volume data, so it is important to stay up to date with current market conditions. This can help you make more informed investment decisions based on the most relevant data.

Conclusion

Technical analysis is a method of evaluating securities by analyzing statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices and volume. It can be a useful tool for identifying trends and potential buying or selling opportunities, but it is important to understand its limitations and to use it in conjunction with other investment approaches. By incorporating technical analysis into your investment strategy and practicing risk management, you can potentially improve your investment decision-making and increase your chances of success.

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